50 Historic Photos of St. Bernard Parish

They are somewhat in chronological order by date taken.  Hope you enjoy these as much as I did:

De la Ronde Plantation, Chalmette, 1866. The site where General Pakenham allegedly took his last breath during the Battle of New Orleans. Source: Wiki Commons

De la Ronde Plantation, Chalmette, 1866. The site where General Pakenham allegedly took his last breath during the Battle of New Orleans. Source: Wiki Commons

Villere Plantation, Chalmette, late 1890s

Villere Plantation, Chalmette, late 1890s. Home to Jacques Villere, first Creole governor of Louisiana.  His home was occupied by the British during the Battle of New Orleans.

Jackson Barracks, 1890s. (Close enough to the parish). Source: Library of Congress

Jackson Barracks, 1890s. (Close enough to the parish). Source: Library of Congress

MacCarthy Plantation (Bonzano House), late 1890s. This plantation was the headquarters for Andrew Jackson during the Battle of New Orleans. It burned down and the Chalmette Port occupies its current location. Source: Library of Congress.

Malus-Beauregard House, late 1890s. Source: Library of Congress.

De la Ronde ruins, date unknown. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

De la Ronde ruins, date unknown.  This was taken after 1877, which was the year the majority of it burned. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Improving levees in Poydras, 1908. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Improving levees in Poydras, 1908. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Lebeau Plantation, Old Arabi, 1910. Source: oldneworleans.com

Lebeau Plantation, Old Arabi, 1910. The plantation eventually burned down in 2013. Source: oldneworleans.com

Chalmette National Cemetery, 1910. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Chalmette National Cemetery, 1910. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Chalmette Monument, 1910s. Source: Library of Congress

Chalmette Monument, 1910s. Source: Library of Congress

Domino Sugar Refinery, 1913. Source: Library of Congress

Domino Sugar Refinery, 1913. Source: Library of Congress

Centennial at Chalmette Monument, 1915. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Centennial at Chalmette Monument, 1915. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flooding in Toca, 1922. Source: Wiki Commons

Flooding in Toca, 1922. Source: Wiki Commons

Flood damage in Poydras, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flood damage in Poydras, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flooding in Violet, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flooding in Violet, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flooding in lower part of the parish, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Flooding in lower part of the parish, 1922. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Pakenham Oaks, 1920s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Pakenham Oaks, 1920s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Levees blown at Caernarvon during the Mississippi River Flood of 1927. Source: The Jesse Earl Hyde Collection, Case Western Reserve University (cwru) Department of Geological Sciences

Levees blown at Caernarvon during the Mississippi River Flood of 1927. Source: The Jesse Earl Hyde Collection, Case Western Reserve University (cwru) Department of Geological Sciences

Kenilworth Plantation, early 1930s. Source: oldneworleans.com

Kenilworth Plantation, early 1930s. Source: oldneworleans.com

Man working outside old slave quarters, 1930s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Man working outside old slave quarters in Violet, 1930s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Old slave quarters in Violet, 1930s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Old slave quarters in Violet, 1930s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Farmer with horse and goods in Terre-aux-Boeuf, date unknown. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Farmer with horse and goods in Terre-aux-Boeufs, date unknown. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Remnants of Villere Plantation, 1930s. I remember playing on what’s left of these ruins as a kid. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Remnants of Villere Plantation, 1930s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Memorial at the pet cemetery in Toca, late 1930s.

Memorial at the pet cemetery in Toca, late 1930s.

Beauregard House, 1934. Source: Library of Congress

Beauregard House, 1934. Source: Library of Congress

Buildings roads in Old Arabi, 1936. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Buildings roads in Old Arabi, 1936. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Working on highway project, 1936. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Working on highway project, 1936. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Chateau des Fleurs, Old Arabi, 1938. Source: Library of Congress

Chateau des Fleurs, Old Arabi, 1938. Source: Library of Congress

Lacoste Plantation, 1938. Source: Library of Congress

Lacoste Plantation, 1938. Source: Library of Congress

Whiskey Bayou, date unknown. One of the many routes used to illegally import alcohol during Prohibition. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Whiskey Bayou, date unknown. One of the many routes used to illegally import alcohol during Prohibition. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Selling and trading fur in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Selling and trading fur at the Community Store in St. Bernard Village, 1941. According to Dr. William Hyland, the St. Bernard Parish historian, the Community Store “is still standing and was purchased by Albert and Gerri Avenel in 1985 after Hurricane Juan flooded their former Delacroix Island home.”  Source: Library of Congress

Maneuvering pirogues in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Maneuvering pirogues in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Isleño trapper taking a cigar break, Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Raphael “Tio Phael” Robin, Isleño trapper, taking a cigar break, Delacroix, 1941. According to Dr. Hyland, he was a “very colorful and well remembered by his family in the 1980s.  He was illiterate, but nevertheless a master of the marshes and waterways in Eastern St. Bernard Parish.  He was a kind and benevolent patriarch of his family.” Source: Library of Congress

Muskrat skins for sale, Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Muskrat skins for sale, Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Trappers’ house in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Trappers’ house in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Isleños drinking and gambling, Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Isleños drinking and gambling, Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Trading furs in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Trading furs in Delacroix, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Spanish trapper's wife and sister-in-law holding dried muskrat skins in front of their camp

According to Dr. Hyland, ” Maria Robin Lopez holding animal pelts, smiling on the left and her sister, “Chica” on the right. “Maria Mamerto” as she was known was famous for her delicious stuffed crabs and quick wit! She married “Mamerto” Lopez, a Spanish-Basque refugee from the civil wars in Spain. He was a mirror image of an Ernest Hemingway character.” 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Delacroix Isle, 1941. Source: Library of Congress

Three Oaks Plantation, 1940s. Destroyed in 1966 by Domino Sugar Refinery. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Three Oaks Plantation, 1940s. Destroyed in 1966 by Domino Sugar Refinery. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

La Maison des Jalousies, Old Arabi, early 1950s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Darcentel-Cavaroc House, Old Arabi, early 1950s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Fazendeville and the Chalmette Monument, late 1950s. Fazendeville, an all Black community started by a freedman, was demolished in 1964 by the National Park Service. Courtesy of the Louisiana Air National Guard, c. 1960

Fazendeville and the Chalmette Monument, late 1950s. Fazendeville, a community of color started by a freedman in 1866, was demolished in 1966 by the National Park Service. Courtesy of the Louisiana Air National Guard, c. 1960

Domino Sugar Refinery, presumably 1950s. Lebeau Plantation in lower right corner. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Domino Sugar Refinery, presumably 1950s. Lebeau Plantation in lower right corner. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Lebeau Plantation, date unknown. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Lebeau Plantation, date unknown. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Kaiser Aluminum Plant, Chalmette, 1950s. My grandfather was working there at the time. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Kaiser Aluminum Plant, Chalmette, 1950s. My grandfather was working there at the time. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Upside houseboat in Shell Beach, 1955. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Upside houseboat in Shell Beach, 1955. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Beauregard House at Chalmette Battlefield, 1960s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Beauregard House at Chalmette Battlefield, 1960s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Chalmette Monument, 1960s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Chalmette Monument, 1960s. Source: Louisiana Digital Library

Battle of New Orleans sesquicentennial at Chalmette Monument, 1965. Fazendeville in the background. Source: NPS

Battle of New Orleans sesquicentennial at Chalmette Monument, 1965. Fazendeville in the background. Source: NPS


If you think any photos should have been included that are not please send them or post them in the comments.  If you have any questions on anything, such as the photographers who took them, the exact locations of buildings no longer there, etc., ask away and I  may be able to help.

Update: With the meticulous help of the resourceful Dr. William Hyland, the St. Bernard Parish historian, some of these photos have been expanded on and/or correctly identified.

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This entry was posted in Louisiana History, New Orleans History, St. Bernard Parish, St. Bernard Parish History and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

94 Responses to 50 Historic Photos of St. Bernard Parish

  1. Diane says:

    These are wonderful to see. Thank you so much for sharing. My husbands cousin, Mr. Brian used to own the Community Store, years ago……thanks again

    • chrisdier504 says:

      You’re very welcome. Do you know the exact location of that Community Store?

      • diane falgout fernandez says:

        I AM NOT THE DIANE WHO POSTED THE ABOVE ON THE COMMUNITY STORE.
        BUT I THINK THAT STORE MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON OLD ST. BERNARD HWY DOWN FROM THE THEN THEN ST. BERNARD HIGH SCHOOL . DIANE FERNANDEZ

    • Clem says:

      Diane, the Community Store in the photo lineup is in the St. Bernard Village, not at Delacroix Island. It still stands today and was remodeled by Jerry and Albert Avenel Sr.
      Clem

  2. Dorothy Collins says:

    I used to walk down there to the Beaureguard house and the monument every year on the last day of school with a few friends and remember the house before it was remodeled. Still go there whenever I can with family, and I am in my 70’s.

  3. Susan Reggio says:

    Would you happen to have any photos of the Reggio plantation?
    Thanks

  4. Mandy Moore says:

    i have a bunch of old MRGO aerials – pre and post construction – that I can send to you if you’re interested, Chris.

  5. Ronald Harper says:

    Wonder how many of these places still stand. Another interesting area is the oak trees along St. Bernard Hwy. . They have to be old. It’s like driving thru a tunnel. I didn’t live in the Parish, but worked in the area for quite a few years. I always admired the beautiful places I saw as I traveled along the roadways along the river.

    • chrisdier504 says:

      Not too many still stand, unfortunately. Historic preservation was not on the minds of many until the 1960s/70s. By then much of old St. Bernard Parish was destroyed by various factors.

    • George D. Soulier IV says:

      I remember traveling through those tree'[s, it’s called Mereux’s Grove, not sure if it is spelled correctly, but I was raised in St.Bernard Parish, and went to St. Bernard High School when it was an all boys school. My grand parents livet on Heights Dr. in Poydras

  6. diane falgout fernandez says:

    I GREW UP IN ST. BERNARD PARISH IN THE 40’S THROUGH LATE 70’S . I REMEMBER SO MUCH OF THIS WITH FOND MEMORIES OF THE HAPPIEST TIMES OF MY LIFE. SO PEACEFUL AND BEAUTIFUL…ONLY SAD THERE WASN’T MORE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OF LANDMARKS AND THEN SO MUCH INDUSTRY TOOK OVER THE PASTORAL SCENES. RUINED THE PARISH I REMEMBER. I REMEMBER RIDING MY HORSE DOWN THE LEVEE BEHIND THE MONUMENT IN THE 50’S. THE LEVEE WAS OPEN FROM THERE TO ARABI. COULD SEE SOME OF THE PLANTATIONS BEFORE THEIR DESTRUCTION. WONDERFUL TIMES.
    THANK YOU FOR THIS. DIANE FALGOUT
    I THINK THE COMMUNITY STORE MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE OLD ST. BERNARD HWY IN ST. BERNARD SEVERAL BLOCKS DOWN FROM THE OLD ST. BERNARD HIGH SCHOOL.
    ( NOW BAYOU RD.)

  7. Thanks for putting this together, its always great to see historic pictures. I regret that I didn’t have room to carry all my photos I had when we evacuated b/c of Katrina. Like photos of Arabi parade and the different landmarks that aren’t there anymore ( Frost top, Hayes Dairy, St Bernard bank, Natalie dress shop, K&B) even though these places shut down b/c Katrina, the landmarks were still there and now the area looks different. The Chalmette drive Inn, and putt putt was other landmarks gone long before Katrina, but it was part of those people who grew up in the 60s & 70s down here. Again thanks —

  8. Judy Charrier says:

    The trapping pictures bring back the memories of my grandfather who was a trapper. He taught me how to clean the hides and then stretch them on the hangers. My grand parents lived off the land as most folks did and times were certainly more simple. It was truly a time when everyone knew everyone in St. Bernard. Growing up in Chalmette from the mid 40’s till mid 60’s, these pictures are priceless since I have so few old pics. Thanks for sharing.

  9. nannydebb says:

    these old photos bring back many memories. My dad, Joseph “Black Joe” Serigne, was a hunter, fisherman and trapper, born in Caenarvon, raised in Delacroix. He got a job with Kaiser Aluminum the year so was born (1951). His badges number was 905, something I’ll never forget. But even though he worked there, he never left the waters of Delacroix, because his vacations were spent back on the boat doing what he dearly loved, either fishing, shrimping or hunting. Thanks for the memories!

  10. Barbara Klees Golden says:

    I have some wonderful pictures will share

    • Barbara, please post your photographs. I remember walking home from St. Maurice school with you to the St. Bernard Bus Stop where you transferred to another bus that took you to your home. I continued walking to my home behind the Dairy Special across from the ice house.

    • Georgette Boos Frichter says:

      Are you Barbara Anna? Was You Mother Barbara Klees. Are you related to Johnny Klees, Isabelle and Charlie L. I grew up in Chalmette and lived by the Court House on Packenham. Georgette

      • Charlie Livaudais says:

        Barbara Anna lives in Lafayette. My Sister Isabella lives in Crowley. I-Charlie Livaudais ,live in Point Clear , Alabama. Bobby Klees lives in Meraux. Aunt Barbara,
        Klees, Johnny Klees and Carolyn Klees, are in heaven. Many relatives still in the Parish, which we visit often. Might make the St. Maurice School upcoming Class Reunion.
        I hope and pray that you and yours will continue to receive peace, prosperity, health, happiness, faith, hope and love — forever Charlie Livaudais

  11. Kim says:

    These are awesome! Thanks for sharing. I have never heard of some of these plantations and others I’ve heard of but never seen.

  12. C.A.M. says:

    I have postcards over 100 years old of the Chalmette Monument, the Domino sugar refinery.the levee by Cowtown in Arabi. the Packenham Oaks,and many places in New Orleans…

  13. Josh says:

    Are there any photos of the Languille Plantation?

  14. Nicole says:

    This is great! Thank you! I’m a Chalmation. Loved seeing the Parish.
    Nicole Foret

  15. Lynette Blackstone Haerer says:

    Thank you so much for posting all of these memories. I grew up in St. Bernard and Chalmette from the 1950s to the early 70s. I was a graduate of Andrew Jackson High School in 72. I visited many of these places and my dad worked at Kaiser from around 1952 until they closed Kaiser in the 90s. I lived right across the street from Kaiser at #1 Coffee drive while mom and dad built their home in Carolyn Court. I walked all over the place as a teen and never feared for anything. Wonderful place to grow up and so many fond memories. Wish is was the same today, but unfortunately too much has happened and so much was destroyed. I miss the old parish!!!!!! Thank you for these memories. 😀 😀 😀

  16. Gena Morgan Asevado says:

    Does anyone have photos of the old Arabi High School on Friscoville.

  17. Brian Evans says:

    Thank you for sharing the pictures my grandparents used to be the groundskeepers @the Kenilworth plantation and my grandfather worked @ kisser in the late 60s .I grew up on farmsite rd in violet great place to grow up

  18. Mike says:

    Great pics.
    I grew up in Chalmette Vista in 60’s. Spent many weekends swimming in batture behind Chalmette cemetery, picking black berries in woods and crawfishing in swamp on other side of Goodchildren (now judge Perez).
    My mom was involved with group that preserved de le Rhonde ruins and Versailles Oaks.
    Really enjoyed driving down the road to go crabbing at Shell beach. What a beautiful ride down the highway.
    St. Bernard was a wonderful place to grow up!

  19. Roy says:

    The house identified as La Maison des Jalousies is actually the Cavaroc House still standing by the Domino Refinery. La Maison des jalousies wears owned by Frederick Roy and was destroyed in 1918.

  20. Joyce Perry says:

    As a child, I visited friends of the family during the summer months around Dalcour, LA. Would anyone have photos of the former home of Leander Perez or photos of that area? I believe it eventually became a school.

  21. Glynn Chevallier says:

    The house identified as MacCarthy Plantation (Bonzano House) 1890,s sure looks like the Beauregard House…even down to the trees. Are they the same?

  22. Mary Jane Veau Breaux says:

    just wonderful seeing these thank you so much.

  23. Jean says:

    I posted a story about the Lacoste plantation on Facebook

  24. Carmen Gonzales says:

    Thank you so much for your time and effort in putting this fabulous collection together. We greatly appreciate it, I was born and raised in yscloskey. We are a living five generations, my grandparent (Joseph n Selina Gonzales just celebrated 71 years of marriage) I can’t wait to share these photos with them, many will bring us great memories, especially the trapping ones.
    Thanks again for sharing.

  25. Got any pictures of the old Ice House in Arabi? Remember many times early in the morning fisherman lined up with their boats behind their cars to get ice and on holiday weekend people getting ice for picnics.

    • chrisdier504 says:

      I’m afraid I don’t know what that is? Sounds very intriguing though. I can certainly look for it.

      • The old Ice House was on St. Bernard Hwy, right across from K & B which eventually was bought out by Rite Aid in the late 90’s. I grew up in Old Arabi (as we always referred to it) and I never saw it operational but my Maw-Maw made sure I knew what our city was about and told us what the building was. There was a small chain-link fence car lot next door to it and a beloved SNOWBALL STAND!!

  26. Gayle Buckley says:

    Chris, thanks for this. As retired teacher who has researched homes in St B for about 30 years, I included additional information (corrections) from other sources.
    Believe # 1 photo of de La Ronde plantation is “by Mugnier circa 1885 taken shortly before the building burned” in Samuel Wilson’s 1965 book Plantation Houses on the Battlefield of New Orleans, pages 62-63. Believe negative at LA State Museum. Have never seen another image of this house and 1866 date too early.
    # 4 is not the Edmond Macarty plantation but Malus-Beauregard. Same book has drawing of Macarty’s house on pages 20-21 from Laclotte’s print, a photo on page 29 and another drawing on page 31. All have porch with columns on front and side. Macarty was later owned by Dr. Bonzano then Henry Beauregard whose brother Rene owned the Malus-Beauregard house at the battlefield which at various times had additions on sides.
    #42 This is not La Maison a Jalousies (house with blinds) last owned by Marie Louise Roche w/o/a Sebastien Frederic Roy, family owned c1836-1905. We have a c1908 image of that home shortly before it was torn down for American Sugar Refinery. This is Cavaroc or White house designed by James Dankin and famous for the palms. Irma Roy and Charles Cavaroc owned c1860-1886. He was first president of the Crescent City Stock Yards & Slaughter House Co. House still on Domino Sugar Refinery grounds, once used as offices now empty. The Roys were brother and sister. Mentioned in Wilson’s book but no image.
    Left same comment for #42 on Louisiana Digital Library website.
    Will share correct photo of Macarty and Roy’s La Maison a Jalousies if you are interested.
    Gayle Cazaubon Buckley

    • Nicholas Fayard says:

      I would like to see that photo of the Maison de Jalousies. It may be more efficient to post the picture on the St. Bernard Memories page on Facebook. I have been looking for that house for a while but never found a photo. Thanks.

      Nick Fayard

      • Gayle Buckley says:

        Nick, don’t do Facebook but will ask son about it. Willing to share image.

      • Nicholas Fayard says:

        I see I am not the only one with St. Bernard Parish history as a hobby. I have since spotted a 1906 photo of the Maison de Jalousies but would like to see your photo. My email is ledbeatle3@gmail.com. Would you happen to have any pictures of Goodchildren St back in the 50’s when it was the up and coming thoroughfare?

    • Nicholas Fayard says:

      Would like to see that Maison de Jalousies picture. That one is tough to come by. It may be best to post it on the St. Bernard Memories page on Facebook.

    • Nicholas Fayard says:

      Pardon the repeat comment

    • Gayle Buckley says:

      Thanks for correcting the caption for Darcentel – Cavaroc house which is still standing but not in use next to the office building at the Sugar Refinery. Gayle

  27. Dr. Michelle M. Carr says:

    Dear Mr. Dier:

    My great, great, great grandparents were Pierre Denis De La Ronde and Marie Madeline Broutin De La Ronde. I have been searching for both information and possibly pictures of them as well as their plantation home, descendants, etc. My family and I were in attendance this year for the 200th Anniversary of The Battle of New Orleans celebration which took place on the ruins of the old home and under the De La Ronde Oaks in Chalmette. Unfortunately, those who organized and took pictures at the event will not return my calls or e-mails. I would so love to have pictures from that day. I am desperately trying to collect any information possible in order to pass it down to future generations of my family. If you have any information or connections to help my search it would be greatly appreciated! Many thanks in advance!!!

    • Jude Noote, Sr says:

      There is a picture of a painting of Mr. De La Ronde in Ancestry.com it also includes a great deal of information. He was married to my 1st cousin 6 times removed Marie Elizabeth Guerbois.
      Please contact me if I can be of any help. Sincerely, Jude

    • Gayle Buckley says:

      Section on de la Ronde family in Old Families of Louisiana by Stanley Arthur and George de Kernion. Should be at main branch of NO libraries and Tulane Special Collections. May be able to buy on Amazon. Also some in Creole Families of New Orleans by Grace King. Also New Orleans Genesis, Vol XXII Jan 1983 No 85 and Vol III No 9 by Coralie Guarino Davis.

  28. Belva Leger says:

    Do you have any pics of the Mascotte (?) House that was in Toca? It was later used as an orphanage for boys, but burned around 1960.

  29. Kevin Reichert says:

    The photo labeled “Chateau des Fleurs, Old Arabi, 1938. Source: Library of Congress”, is one of Very Few pictures that I’ve ever seen of this house. I would LOVE any additional information or photographs of this property. I’ve owned and lived in the house that was built on that site after the fire. There used to be lettering that was cemented in our driveway that read “MAUMUS” if that helps?
    Thank you for ALL the great pictures; I look forward to hearing back from you with any information or pictures that you (or anyone) may have to share.
    Thanks Again, and God Bless..

  30. kathy anderson elmore says:

    chrisdier504, my brother and I grew up around the corner from your mother and uncle Leslie. my mother and your grandmother Chetta were friends from our St. Mark days. I have many fond memories of being the “obnoxious little sister” when your uncle and the St. Mark boys would be hanging out at our house with my brother! what is he up to these days? I’m sure my brother (Herb Anderson) would love to know.

  31. Greetings All! I am very excited to come across this beautiful resources. My name is Alyssa Arnell and I am a National Park Ranger and Outreach Coordinator for the Chalmette Battlefield. I am very interested in creating partnerships and providing opportunities for on-site meetings and events. With all of the historical contributions that have been made by those who lovingly contributed to the photography and the community responses, I would love to hear from anyone who might be interested in getting together. We could start with a meet and greet for a chat on your individual histories. Please let me know if any of you are interested. I can be reached at alyssa_arnell@nps.gov

  32. Andre Hebert says:

    No one seems to have any photos of the Jumonville plantation home, it’s was captured by the British. It had a school, a hospital, etc. this was our family’s home

  33. Clem says:

    The young man in the Community Store photo is my brother, Manuel J. Mackles Jr.. He is on the left with one foot on the porch and the other on the ground. There are other photos taken the same day that include my father (Sr.) at the Los Islenos.

  34. Alyssa Arnell says:

    Greetings All,

    On behalf of the National Park Services at Chalmette Battlefield and National Cemetery, I would like to extend the offer to host a meet and greet at the Visitor Center for those of you who may wish to come together and share your memories and photos in person. If you are interested, please contact me at 504-940-7890, or email me at alyssa_arnell@nps.gov.

  35. John Grey says:

    What was the name of the plantation that was between Lebeau and Cavaroc? Cavaroc is still standing on the grounds of the sugar refinery

    • Alyssa Arnell says:

      I am only finding illustrations that show the properties around Chalmette are from 1808, 1815, 1831, 1834,1841, 1867, 1874, and 1902. None of these maps identify the Lebeau or Cavaroc plantations.

  36. benoit GUILLOUX says:

    I thought that the BONZANO HOUSE used by Gen. Jackson as a HQ was the same house as the one of Mauricio CONWAY and his wife Jeanne-Francoise née MacCarthy?

    • benoit GUILLOUX says:

      If this house has been called because of Dr. Bozano who came later, after the battle, what was the former name of the house that Gen. Jackson used as his HQ then and when had it been built?

      • Alyssa Arnell says:

        I understand it to be the McCarty Plantation. From my records, McCarty purchased the property from an earlier Fazende. This information has come up through research of Tulane’s deed records.

  37. benoit GUILLOUX says:

    In short, I am trying to locate the plantation of Mauricio Conway which, in 1787 at the time of the death of Francois de Reggio as per the Calbildo documentation, was said to be 2 leagues down the river from the New-Orleans of the time. (2 leagues are approx 11kms or 6.8 miles.) However, maps of 1815 show that the MacCarthy plantation, where Gen. Jackson’s HQ was, is 4 miles from town? This puzzles me…

  38. Alyssa Arnell says:

    I understand the Chalmette Plantation to be between 6-7 miles downriver. My earliest map showing the names of plantations is from 1815. Upriver from Macarty was Languille, Sigur, Delery, Piernas, Solomon Provost, Dupre, Butler, Dupleais, Macarty (again), Montreuil, Bronier, Daunois and then the suburn of Marigny.

  39. Dian Vidrine says:

    Thanks Chris for putting these up for us to view. Really appreciate it. Had forgotten about all this history since we moved away. So good to have these memories back to view. It is really strange how you take all of this for granted until you move away.

  40. Leslie Schmidt says:

    Do you know anything about Place Moliere?? It is on an old plat of Versailles subdivision which is along Paris Rd. Current Google maps seem to place that Square between 353 and 354 in the swamp. Was wondering if it was ever a homestead. Much of the land on the tax rolls in that area are underwater. The subdivision plat dates to late 1800’s. Land has been on the tax rolls since 1900.

  41. Cherreen CJ Johnson says:

    Hi the pics r amazing I’ve been fascinated with my parishes history too FOREVER!! The pic of Lebeau ( date unknown ) is from the 1930s !! Sorry I can’t b more exact but I have lots of pics n history n genealogy of my isleno ancestry etc that thank god I took with me for Katrina evacuation !!! Along with all my cemetery records !! Great work keep it up 😘

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